Feeding Your Golf Addiction In The Winter Part 11: Sort Your Golf Scorecards

This is the eleventh in a series on things to do to feed your golf addiction in the off season:

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Organize Your Golf Scorecards

By the end of each season, my golf bag, car and desk are littered with the scorecards of rounds past. So one of my off-season tasks is to round up all those scorecards and throw away the ones I don’t want or need.

It’s more fun that you might think, and actually a great way to feed the golf addiction. I take notes on many of my rounds, so each card holds a memory of a (usually) warmer, and more enjoyable (again, usually) time. In any case, they are mostly worth revisiting.

After review, the vast majority of the cards end up in the recycling bin. Special ones, however, find a place in my scorecard binder. I always keep scorecards from fresh courses. And I’ll occasionally keep one from a particularly memorable round. That usually means a low score, but occasionally includes rounds that stick in my memory for other reasons. I also keep yardage books, which I purchase for every course which offers one.

Those scorecards and yardage books serve as my memory archive of my golfing past, and like my wife with the wedding photos, I occasionally take them out for a trip down memory lane.

Postscript: I also take time in the offseason to round up and sort through all of the golf pencils I’ve accumulated. Like scorecards, I keep the memorable ones. The rest to to school, where I loan them out to my students when they (inevitably) forget to bring one one a test day. I like to mess with their heads by telling them as I give them the pencil … “wow, this is bad one. I remember that. I shot like forty over par. Hope you have better luck.”

But I’m evil like that.

 

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