True Knit II Shoes Review

True Knit II Shoes Review

True Knit II Golf Shoes
Grade; A
Teacher’s Comments: A near-perfect golf shoe for walking in warmer weather

Manufacturer’s Site
on Amazon

Lightweight and cool, the True Knit II is a near-perfect golf shoe for the walking golfer

With knit uppers, the shoes are breathable, ensuring cool comfort on even the hottest days (we actually have had a couple of hot days in Michigan this Spring).

Flexibility from the knit fabric serves to conform snugly, while accommodating any particular structural oddities one’s foot may possess. As light as the shoe is, the stretchy, conforming knit makes my feet feel as though they are solidly in place through the swing.

The soles on the True Knit II are thin, feeling nearly insubstantial. When walking in these shoes, I often feel as though I am playing in my bare feet. The great Sam Snead opined that practicing barefoot helps with weight transfer and tempo. I can certainly feel my weight transfer in the True Knits.

Unlike some other True models, the knit is not a “zero drop” model (meaning the drop from heel to toe; traditional dress shoes with heels have a substantial drop). However, with just 6mm of drop, the True Knit II is very close. For comparison, running shoes can have as much as 12mm of drop.

The shoe’s sole is made of a foamlike rubber that bends easily in the hand. You can touch the toe to the heel with no effort at all. A tread of rectangular nubbins and grooves offers more than enough grip for this moderate speed swinger of the club.

I imagine that TRUE’s soles also will provide enough grip for faster swingers as well. PGA TOUR players Ryan Moore, Chris Kirk and Joel Dahmen all are TRUE brand ambassadors.

Between the knit uppers and the lightweight sole, the TRUE Knit II comes in at around 9 ounces. In comparison, the Nike Air Zoom comes in at 16 ounces per shoe. If you’re used to more traditional golf shoes, you will absolutely feel the difference.

As an aside, I’ll say that these shoes are as comfortable in my school classroom as they are on the course — maybe even more so. The treads do not preclude wearing them indoors (indeed, I don’t notice the treads indoors). On hard tile floors, they ease a great deal of foot weariness.

I repeat that I think TRUE’s Knit II are nearly perfect walking shoes.

I say near perfect, however, because there are two (very small issues).

The first is that they get wet in heavy dew. Easy solution: wear them only on afternoon rounds, when you will appreciate how cool they are. TRUE also makes shoes that are waterproof, weight only slightly more and are equally as comfortable to walk in.

The second is that the soles are so soft and flexible that you’ll feel the gravel on cart paths. Easy solution: don’t walk on gravel. On my home course (Washtenaw Golf Club), there are only a couple of spots where a golfer might need to cross over a gravel path.

True’s Knit II shoes are priced to sell. Right now, they are as low as $99 on Amazon. They come in a variety of colors, ranging from the Deep Sea you see in the photos, to various shades of grey, white, black and a vino. You’ll find one in a color you like.

One final note: I know a feller with Multiple Sclerosis who swears by these shoes. The condition flares up in hot weather; keeping the feet cool helps keep his body temperature down and alleviates symptoms.

Final verdict: Highly Recommended.


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3 thoughts on “True Knit II Shoes Review”

  1. It does not appear that any of the knit versions are waterproof. If we want waterproof we go to a more traditional offering. The knit versions sound great but I play a lot of early morning and marginal weather golf.

    Reply
  2. It’s important to consider specific needs, such as playing golf in early morning or marginal weather conditions. While the knit versions may offer their own unique benefits, it’s understandable that for certain situations, a more traditional waterproof option would be preferred.

    Reply

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