Rush Lake Hills Golf Course Review

Rush Lake Hills (1 of 9)

Rush Lake Hills Golf Course
Pinckney, Michigan

Grade: C
Teacher’s Comments: A pleasant country course.

I first became aware of Rush Lake Hills when the boy’s golf team I coached was invited there to a multi-school tournament. I was intrigued by its down-home feel, and have since returned to play several times.

Rush Lake Hills is really two courses, and I wouldn’t be surprised if someone told me that the two nines were built at different times. The first nine is relatively flat and long (3,334 yards), with generous fairways. Bombers will love it.

Rush Lake Hills (3 of 9)

The back nine is shorter (2,861 yards), but much more tight and incorporating some more serious elevation changes. Accuracy is at a premium here.

Interestingly, the course is a par 73 (you don’t see too many of those). Total yardage from the back tees is 6237, while playng to a 69.9/118. From the front tees, it’s at 4,964 and 67.3/114. There are only two sets of tees.

Conditions at the course have been hit or miss for me. On one occasion I noted that it was in great shape. On another, I took a photograph of a relatively shoddy fairway to remind me of the poor conditions.

Rush Lake Hills (4 of 9)

Truth be told, though, I’ve had a lot of fun at Rush Lake Hills. It’s got a sort of country charm, accentuated by the WW II style quonset hut that serves as the clubhouse. The one nine lets you grip it and rip it, while the other rewards the strategic thinker. You’re not likely to lose any balls, and even the double-bogey golfer will have a good time.

Make no mistake, though. This is not a “championship” course. It’s a basic, no frills, hit a few balls and have some good times kind of course.

You can’t beat the price at Rush Lake Hills. As of May 2013, it’s $20 with a cart on the weekdays; $32 with cart on weekends.

Rush Lake Hills (5 of 9)

There’s another interesting aspect to Rush Lake Hills. It was built 1961 by Robert Herndon from a Robert Montville design. Herndon ran the course until his death, when ownership was assigned to the Henry Ford Hospital. Today, all of the profits from the course to to the Henry Ford’s Cancer Research Program.

More photos below:

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