123rd US Open Fact Sheet

123rd US Open Fact Sheet

Some basic facts about the US Open from the USGA:

PAR AND YARDAGE                                  
The Los Angeles Country Club’s North Course will be set up at 7,423 yards and will play to a par of 35-35–70. The yardage for each round of the championship will vary due to course setup and conditions. 

The Los Angeles Country Club (North Course) Hole By Hole         
Hole 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Total 
Par 35 
Yardage 590 497 419 228 480 330 284 537 171 3,536 
                      
Hole 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Total 
Par 35 
Yardage 409 290 380 507 623 124 542 520 492 3,887 

ARCHITECTS 
George C. Thomas Jr. designed The Los Angeles Country Club’s current North Course, which opened for play in 1928. W. Herbert Fowler designed the club’s original North Course and South Course, which opened in 1921. Gil Hanse, along with Jim Wagner and Geoff Shackelford, restored the Thomas design of the North Course in 2010 while Hanse also did work on the South Course, which was completed in 2016. 

COURSE RATING AND SLOPE 
Based on the course setup for the championship, the Course Rating™ for the North Course at The Los Angeles Country Club is 76.9 and its Slope Rating® is 148. 

WHO CAN ENTER                    

The championship is open to any professional golfer and any amateur golfer with a Handicap Index® not exceeding 1.4. 

ENTRIES 

The USGA accepted a record 10,187 entries for the 2023 U.S. Open, which surpasses the previous mark of 10,127 established in 2014 at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club. It is the 11th consecutive time and the 14th time overall that entries have topped the 9,000 mark, and just the second time entries have exceeded 10,000. (The 2020 championship field was all-exempt due to COVID-19.) 

LOCAL QUALIFYING    

Local qualifying, played over 18 holes, was conducted at 109 sites in 44 U.S. states and Canada between April 17-May 22. There were 14 local qualifying sites in California, the most of any state. Florida hosted 13 local qualifiers. 

FINAL QUALIFYING      

Final qualifying, played over 36 holes, was held at 10 sites in the United States and three international sites. The U.S. sites were in Texas on May 22 and in California, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio (Columbus & Springfield) and Washington on June 5. England (May 16), Japan (May 22) and Canada (June 5) hosted international qualifying. 

CHAMPIONSHIP FIELD 
The starting field of 156 golfers will be cut after 36 holes to the low 60 scorers and ties. 

SCHEDULE OF PLAY 
Eighteen holes of stroke play are scheduled each day from June 15 (Thursday) through June 18 (Sunday). In the event of a tie after 72 holes, a two-hole aggregate playoff (holes 1 and 18) will take place following the completion of Sunday’s final round. 

 
2022 CHAMPION 

Matt Fitzpatrick, a 27-year-old Englishman, became the 13th man and the first non-American to add the U.S. Open Championship to a victory in the U.S. Amateur. In winning the 122nd edition of the U.S. Open last June by one stroke over Will Zalatoris and Scottie Scheffler at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass., Fitzpatrick also joined World Golf Hall of Famer and 18-time major champion Jack Nicklaus as the only golfers to have won the USGA’s two oldest championships at the same venue. Nicklaus accomplished his feat at Pebble Beach Golf Links in 1961 and 1972, while Fitzpatrick prevailed in the 2013 U.S. Amateur at Brookline. Fitzpatrick hit 17 of 18 greens in carding a final-round 68 for a 6-under total of 274. Trailing Zalatoris by one, Fitzpatrick’s fortunes changed at the par-4 13th when he converted a 49-foot birdie putt. When Fitzpatrick won the 2013 U.S. Amateur title over Oliver Goss of Australia, he closed out the final match on the par-4 15th hole, and he essentially won the U.S. Open on the same hole, making a 19-footer for birdie after reaching the green with a 220-yard 5-iron from the right rough. Zalatoris made bogey on No. 15 to fall two behind and Fitzpatrick would finish with three consecutive pars, including reaching the putting surface on the 18th from 160 yards out of a fairway bunker. Zalatoris, who lost in a playoff to Justin Thomas in the PGA Championship in May, had one last chance to force a playoff, but his 15-foot putt on the final hole skirted the left edge. Scheffler, who won the Masters two months earlier, birdied three of his first four holes in the final round but was derailed by a double bogey on the par-3 11th. 
 
WHAT THE WINNER RECEIVES 
Among the benefits enjoyed by the U.S. Open winner are: 
►A U.S. Open exemption for the next 10 years 
►An invitation to the next five Masters Tournaments 
►An invitation to the next five Open Championships, conducted by The R&A 
►An invitation to the next five PGA Championships 
►An invitation to the next five Players Championships 
►Exempt status on the PGA Tour for five years 
►Custody of U.S. Open Trophy for one year, Jack Nicklaus Medal and a replica trophy 

QUALIFYING FOR THE OTHER MAJORS            

The top 10 finishers (and ties) are exempt into the following year’s U.S. Open. The top four finishers (and ties) are invited to the following year’s Masters Tournament. 

CHAMPIONSHIP HISTORY 

This is the 123rd U.S. Open Championship. The U.S. Open, which was first played in 1895, was not contested for two years (1917-1918) during World War I and for four years (1942-1945) during World War II. The youngest winner of the U.S. Open is 19-year-old John McDermott, who won in 1911; he is among nine players age 21 or younger who have won the U.S. Open. The oldest winner is Hale Irwin, who was 45 and playing on a special exemption when he won his third U.S. Open title in 1990. Irwin also won in 1974 and 1979. 

There are four four-time U.S. Open winners: Willie Anderson (1901, 1903, 1904, 1905), amateur Bob Jones (1923, 1926, 1929, 1930), Ben Hogan (1948, 1950, 1951, 1953), and Jack Nicklaus (1962, 1967, 1972, 1980). 

Only six players have won the Masters and U.S. Open titles in the same year: Craig Wood (1941), Ben Hogan (1951, 1953), Arnold Palmer (1960), Jack Nicklaus (1972), Tiger Woods (2002) and Jordan Spieth (2015). 
 
PURSE 

The 2022 purse was $17.5 million, the highest among golf’s major championships; the winner earned $3.15 million. The 2023 purse is to be announced. 
 
THE LOS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB NOTES 

►The 123rd U.S. Open will be the first conducted at The Los Angeles Country Club 

►Los Angeles will host its first U.S. Open in 75 years; it was played at The Riviera Country Club in 1948 

►LACC will host its fourth USGA championship and first since the 2017 Walker Cup Match 

►The 2023 U.S. Open will be the 86th USGA championship held in California, second-most of any state (Pennsylvania, 90) 

►In 2023, the U.S. Open Championship will be played in California for the 15th time 

►The course for the U.S. Open Championship will have five par 3s for the first time since 1947 when it was played at St. Louis (Mo.) Country Club 

THE LOS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB HISTORY 

In 1897, a group calling themselves the Los Angeles Golf Club led by Joseph Sartori and Edward Tufts organized an association to further the cause of one of Southern California’s newest sports. After outgrowing three locations and years of planning, the club bordering Beverly Hills officially opened on May 30, 1911. Its stately clubhouse, tennis courts and golf courses have served as the club’s home ever since. The original 18-hole golf course was laid out by Sartori, Tufts, Norman Macbeth and Charles Orr. 

In 1921, British golf architect W. Herbert Fowler created two new 18-hole courses at the existing location to address the increasing popularity of the game of golf and The Los Angeles Country Club. In the late 1920s, legendary golf course architect and club member George C. Thomas Jr. redesigned the North Course, later called his greatest design. In 2010, the North Course was unveiled after a five-year project led by noted architect Gil Hanse restored Thomas’ 1928 layout. Balancing the unique architectural vision of the North Course and the functionality necessary to sustain its design well into the future, Hanse achieved what Thomas himself envisioned when he said: “In golf course construction, art and utility meet. Both are absolutely vital; one is utterly ruined without the other.” Archived photos, written documents and physical unearthing of landforms provided the framework for a finished product that reflects the past.   

In March 2015, the club undertook a significant 16-month renovation of the historic 106-year-old clubhouse (designed by architect and club member Sumner Hunt) to restore its original grandeur. The reopening in August 2016 included the rededication of the Reagan Terrace in honor of Ronald Reagan, the 40th president of the United States and member of The Los Angeles Country Club.  

In late 2015, Hanse began a renovation of the club’s South Course, designed to provide a different but complementary experience from the North Course. The South Course reopened in July 2016.  

USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS AT LACC 

The Los Angeles Country Club’s North Course has previously hosted three USGA championships. Glenna Collett (Vare) won the fifth of a record six U.S. Women’s Amateur titles when she defeated Virginia Van Wie, 6 and 5, in the 1930 championship final. In 1954, Foster Bradley defeated Al Geiberger, 3 and 1, in a battle of two Southern Californians for the U.S. Junior Amateur titleIn each case, it was the first time that the championship was contested on the West Coast. 

In 2017, Collin Morikawa was one of three Americans to win all four of his matches in leading the United States to a convincing 19-7 victory over Great Britain and Ireland in the 46th Walker Cup Match. Two-time major champion Morikawa was joined by Maverick McNealy and Doug Ghim with perfect marks as the USA recorded the Match’s second-largest margin of victory. The Americans entered Day 2 of the two-day competition with an 8-4 advantage and went on to post a 3-1 record in foursomes and a 7-1-2 mark in singles. GB&I’s Jack Singh Brar, of England, went 3-1 in his matches. It was the second Walker Cup to be contested in California. 

1930 U.S. Women’s Amateur: Glenna Collett (Vare) def. Virginia Van Wie, 6 and 5 

1954 U.S. Junior Amateur: Foster Bradley def. Allen Geiberger, 3 and 1 

2017 Walker Cup Match: USA def. Great Britain and Ireland, 19-7 

OTHER EVENTS AT LACC 

1926 Los Angeles Open: Harry Cooper by three strokes over George Von Elm, 279-282 

1934 Los Angeles Open: Macdonald Smith by eight strokes over Willie Hunter, Bill Mehlhorn, 280-288 

1935 Los Angeles Open: Vic Ghezzi def. Johnny Revolta, 285 (73) – 285 (75) 

1936 Los Angeles Open: Jimmy Hines by four strokes over Henry Picard, Jimmy Thomson, 280-284 

1940 Los Angeles Open: Lawson Little by one stroke over Clayton Heafner, 282-283 

USGA CHAMPIONSHIPS IN CALIFORNIA 

This will be the 86th USGA championship played in California and the 15th U.S. Open contested in the state. In 2023, the U.S. Women’s Open will be played at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links, the U.S. Women’s Amateur will be held at Bel-Air Country Club, in Los Angeles, and the U.S. Senior Amateur will be contested at Martis Camp Club, in Truckee. 

U.S. Open Championships in California (14): 

1948: The Riviera Country Club, Pacific Palisades (Ben Hogan) 

1955: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Jack Fleck) 

1966: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Billy Casper) 

1972: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Jack Nicklaus) 

1982: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Tom Watson) 

1987: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Scott Simpson) 

1992: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Tom Kite) 

1998: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Lee Janzen) 

2000: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Tiger Woods) 

2008: Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), San Diego (Tiger Woods) 

2010: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Graeme McDowell) 

2012: The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco (Webb Simpson) 
2019: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Pebble Beach (Gary Woodland) 

2021: Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), San Diego (Jon Rahm) 

1948 U.S. OPEN 

Ben Hogan won the first of his four U.S. Opens with a 72-hole score of 276 (8 under par), two strokes better than Jimmy Demaret, at The Riviera Country Club in Pacific Palisades, Calif. Hogan shot 68-69 on the final day to smash Ralph Guldahl’s championship scoring mark set in 1937 by five shots, and his three rounds in the 60s were a first in U.S. Open competition. In a little more than one year, Hogan won the 1947 and 1948 Los Angeles Opens and the U.S. Open at Riviera, earning the course – like Los Angeles Country Club’s North Course, a George C. Thomas Jr. design – the nickname “Hogan’s Alley.” 

LONGEST U.S. OPEN COURSES 

  • 7,845 yards, Erin Hills, first round, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 7,839 yards, Erin Hills, second round, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 7,818 yards, Erin Hills, third round, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 7,721 yards, Erin Hills, fourth round, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 7,695 yards, Chambers Bay, second round, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 7,676 yards, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), fourth round, San Diego, Calif., 2021 
  • 7,664 yards, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), second round, San Diego, Calif., 2021 
  • 7,637 yards, Chambers Bay, third round, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 7,635 yards, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), first round, San Diego, Calif., 2021 
  • 7,616 yards, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), third round, San Diego, Calif., 2021 
  • 7,603 yards, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), second round, San Diego, Calif., 2008 

LONGEST PAR 3s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY 

  • 300 yards, 8th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 299 yards, 8th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016 
  • 281 yards, 8th, second round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 281 yards, 8th, second round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016
  • 279 yards, 8th, third round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 266 yards, 3rd, fourth round, Merion G.C. (East Course), Ardmore, Pa., 2013 
  • 264 yards, 2nd, first round, Shinnecock Hills G.C., Southampton, N.Y., 2018 
  • 261 yards, 8th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 258 yards, 8th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016 
  • 256 yards, 3rd, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012 

LONGEST PAR 4s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY 

  • 551 yards, 13th, second round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 544 yards, 11th, second round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 542 yards, 4th, third round, Pinehurst Resort & C.C. (Course No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C., 2014 
  • 541 yards, 11th, first round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015
  • 541 yards, 11th, fourth round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 536 yards, 14th, first round, Shinnecock Hills G.C., Southampton, N.Y., 2018 
  • 534 yards, 14th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 534 yards, 6th, third round, Torrey Pines Golf Course (South Course), San Diego, Calif., 2021 
  • 533 yards, 13th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 
  • 530 yards, 11th, third round, Chambers Bay, University Place, Wash., 2015 

LONGEST PAR 5s IN U.S. OPEN HISTORY 

  • 684 yards, 12th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016 
  • 681 yards, 18th, fourth round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 676 yards, 18th, second round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 674 yards, 12th, third round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2016 
  • 671 yards, 16th, third round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012 
  • 667 yards, 12th, first round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 667 yards, 12th, second round, at Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007 
  • 667 yards, 12th, fourth round, Oakmont (Pa.) C.C., 2007
  • 667 yards, 18th, third round, Erin Hills, Erin, Wis., 2017 
  • 660 yards, 16th, first round, The Olympic Club (Lake Course), San Francisco, Calif., 2012 

THE LAST TIME IT HAPPENED AT THE U.S. OPEN

  •  Matt Fitzpatrick: last international winner (2022) 
  • Brooks Koepka: last to defend title (2018) 
  • Francis Ouimet: last winner in his first attempt (1913) 
  • Webb Simpson: last winner in his second attempt (2012) 
  • Martin Kaymer: last start-to-finish winner with no ties (2014) 
  • Jon Rahm: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole to win by one stroke (2021)
  • Jon Rahm: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole (2021) 
  • Tiger Woods: last winner to birdie the 72nd hole to force a playoff (2008) 
  • Geoff Ogilvy: last winner without a round in the 60s (2006) 
  • Gary Woodland: last winner with all rounds in the 60s (2019) 
  • Matt Fitzpatrick: last winner between ages 20-29 (27 in 2022) 
  • Gary Woodland: last winner between ages 30-39 (35 in 2019) 
  • Payne Stewart: last winner age 40 and older (42 in 1999) 
  • Gary Woodland: last defending champion to miss the cut (2020) 
  • Hale Irwin: last winner who received a special exemption (1990) 
  • Lucas Glover: last winner to come through final qualifying (2009) 
  • Orville Moody: last winner to come through local and final qualifying (1969) 
  • John Goodman: last amateur winner (1933) 

CHAMPIONSHIP TROPHY 

The first United States Open Championship was won by Horace Rawlins in September 1895 at Newport Golf Club in Rhode Island. Rawlins earned $150, a gold champion’s medal, and possession of the championship sterling silver cup for one year. The trophy was designated for display at Rawlins’ club until it was presented to the next year’s champion. Thus began an annual rite that has endured for more than a century. 

The original two-handled cup was destroyed by fire in September 1946 at Lloyd Mangrum’s home country club, Tam O’Shanter, outside of Chicago. The USGA considered replacing it with a new design, but opted instead to preserve the look of the original with a full-scale replica on April 24, 1947. This replica remained in service, passed from champion to champion until 1986, when it was permanently retired to the USGA Golf Museum. Today, the U.S. Open champion receives possession of the 1986 full-scale replica. The original U.S. Open Trophy is on display at the USGA Golf Museum in Liberty Corner, N.J. 

FUTURE U.S. OPENS IN THIS DECADE             

June 13-16, 2024: Pinehurst Resort & Country Club (Course No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C. 

June 12-15, 2025: Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club 

June 18-21, 2026: Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, Southampton, N.Y. 

June 17-20, 2027: Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links 

June 15-18, 2028: Winged Foot Golf Club (West Course), Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

June 14-17, 2029: Pinehurst Resort & Country Club (Course No. 2), Village of Pinehurst, N.C. 

TELEVISION COVERAGE 

The 123rd U.S. Open will receive more than 46 hours of live coverage on NBC, USA Network and Peacock during championship rounds. 

Date/DayTime (Local/PDT)NetworkCoverage
June 15/Thursday6:40-10 a.m.PeacockFirst Round
 10 a.m.-5 p.m.USA NetworkFirst Round
 5-8 p.m.NBCFirst Round
June 16/Friday6:40-10 a.m.PeacockSecond Round
 10 a.m.-5 p.m.USA NetworkSecond Round
 5-8 p.m.NBCSecond Round
June 17/Saturday10 a.m.-8 p.m.NBCThird Round
June 18/Sunday9-10 a.m.PeacockFourth Round
 10 a.m.-7 p.m.NBCFourth Round

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